Wednesday, 20 April 2016

Term 2 - 2016 - HANGARAU "What makes our boat float"



IN PREPARATION FOR HANGARAU STUDIES if you have nothing to do Saturday 23.04.2016, Te Kakano students might enjoy a visit to the following (Whaea Trudie will be there taking photos if she's allowed).  Nau mai, haere mai

HMNZS HAWEA is one of the Navy’s four Inshore Patrol Vessels (IPVs). The ships are designed for maritime surveillance and patrol missions around New Zealand’s 15,000 kilometre coast and out to the 200 nautical mile limit of our Exclusive Economic Zone. The ship is coming to Tauranga and this is a rare opportunity for you to have a good look over one of the ships.

WHAT TO BRING:
For safety, please wear closed toe footwear when embarking onto the ship.

Please also bring drinking water – as the ship will only be able to supply emergency water.

Sunscreen – there is little shade on-board.

PARKING & ACCESS:
HAWEA will be berthed at Number 1 Berth, Port of Tauranga
Public access to HAWEA is via the Salisbury Gate (next door to Mount Ocean Sports Club).
Parking is available outside the gate, on Salisbury Ave and the Mall, Pilot Bay

There will be barriers in place, port security and RNZN personnel to assist with access. Please note this a 'working wharf' so escorts will be in place to help with the short walk from the gate to HAWEA.

The IPVs primary mission is to protect the security and prosperity of New Zealanders by undertaking maritime security patrols, surveillance, boarding operations and response to search and rescue call outs. The four ships regularly work with government agencies such as Fisheries, Customs, Police and the Department of Conservation and are frequent visitors to ports throughout the country.

Capability and Role. The Inshore Patrol Vessels are designed to work around the New Zealand coast undertaking maritime security patrols, surveillance, boarding operations and search and rescue activities.

1 comment:

  1. Aue! it was PACKED! unfortunately unable to take photos, but if YOU have any Te Kakano me whanau; they will be most welcomed in our morning talks. kia ora

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